Grout Museum opens a renovated planetarium to the public | The Steele Report


WATERLOO, Iowa (KWWL) – Waterloo’s famous Grout Museum is ready to welcome the public in its new and recently renovated name Norris Corson family planetarium.

Since Monday, the new planetarium is now open to the public.

The Grout also has several current exhibits, including one dedicated to the Iowans who served in the Pacific Theater of World War II.

The remodeling actually began when the museum was temporarily shutting down to help limit the spread of COVID-19 at the start of the pandemic.

The new Planetarium will open its doors to the general public on December 27.

“The technology we have here is top of the line. Even if you sit in this intimate little room, you get the quality show you would get in Chicago, New York, or any of the other bigger planetariums.” said Carrsan Morrisey, the museum’s programming director.

Updates include 4k laser projector system, Digital planetarium control system, LED cover lighting and 5.1 surround sound. The neighborhood also replaced the carpet, updated the electrical aspects, gave it a new coat of reflective paint on the original dome and 30 new theater-style reclining seats.

“The only thing that’s the same in this room, since 1953, I believe, when this place was first built, is the dome. We have the same dome that we’ve always had,” Morrissey said. .

Morrissey, who uses them / them pronouns, says they’re excited to explore the possibilities with planetarium upgrades. They add that, regardless of one’s background, the planetarium can appeal to anyone.

“The ability to look at the stars is a great unifier. It doesn’t matter why you come to the museum,” Morrissey said. “No matter who you are, no matter what you’ve come to see here, there will be something that surprises you.”

Tickets for the planetarium cost $ 6 for adults and $ 3 for children. Members of the museum are free.

The timetables will be available on gmdistrict.org/planetarium. It opens to the general public on December 27, 2021.

The museum thanked the following for making the project possible: Barbara Corson, Black Hawk County Gaming Association, Roy J. Carver Charitable Trust, RJ McElroy Trust Cathy Livingston Fund (Community Foundation of Northeast Iowa,) The Leighty Fund, Sandra Rada -Aleff, Sally Darragh, Kathy Breckunitch, Frederick W. Mast Family Fund and Greg & Lynette Harter.


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